My dentist messed up my teeth. What can I do?

I went to my dentist to get a wadding done and he touched a nerve. This resulted in me one in pain for several weeks. When I go back he said the tooth is possibly dying and he'll need to pinch it out or do a root canal.

I asked my sister-in-law who is also a dentist in Greece around it and she said he is definately responsible for the trouble with my teeth.

How do I ask for a refund on the nourishing and money to get the root canal done elsewhere because he isn't competent? It's almost impossible to prove but I can't afford a lb250 root waterway at the moment and it is his fault that I need one.

Does anyone enjoy any ideas what to do?
I am not sure if you could blame on your dentist for exposing the nerve. The most important contained by restoring a tooth is to rid of all cavities and some times we expose the cheek because the caries is close to the nerve. I am also surprised that your sister-in-law actually said it be the dentist's fault without mortal there herself.

However, if you have any proof that the dentist nastily exposed the nerve then you enjoy every right to be upset. It is very difficult to determine if the dentist was at idiosyncrasy. Go see your dentist and ask about it. Depending on where you are, the local dental society may enjoy a peer review group that may intervene. Hope this helped. Good luck.
Before you let him touch your teeth again, go to another dentist and transmit them this. They may be able to tell and write up some big-hearted of formal report or at least be able to point u surrounded by the right direction. I have a feeling he requirements u to come back ASAP to get rid of the tooth he messed up on and cover his own tracks. Def see another doctor!! appropriate luck I am not sure if you could blame on your dentist for exposing the nerve. The most important contained by restoring a tooth is to rid of all cavities and some times we expose the cheek because the caries is close to the nerve. I am also surprised that your sister-in-law actually said it be the dentist's fault without mortal there herself.

However, if you have any proof that the dentist nastily exposed the nerve then you enjoy every right to be upset. It is very difficult to determine if the dentist was at idiosyncrasy. Go see your dentist and ask about it. Depending on where you are, the local dental society may enjoy a peer review group that may intervene. Hope this helped. Good luck.
Answers:    I'm sorry to say, but your sister-n-law have no way of knowing that it was your dentists culpability, and as a dentist should not be blaming another dentist for a patients dental problems without knowing the facts.

There are dental problems that than come up after any type of dental work is done, including fillings. In abundant instances the living nerve in the tooth is not especially sound at the time the filling is done, and the trauma caused by removal of the decomposition or the old filling can push the boldness over the edge causing an irreversible pulpitis (inflammation of the nerve) which will organize to the eventual death of the nerve. Situations surrounded by which the nerve of the tooth remains sensitive to cold, or hurts without anything touching it can scrounging that the nerve has died, and the one and only solution to this problem is either to perform a root conduit treatment or extraction on the tooth. This is not necessarily a result of anything that a dentist did wrong.

Another problem that can arise from doing a filling is a crack. Removal of an old satisfying or decay may reveal a crack in the floor of the cavity preparation. This can front to cracked tooth syndrome which means that the tooth hurts whenever pressure is applied to one or more cusps (points) of the tooth. Cracked teeth happen adjectives the time in dentistry, and they are one of our most challenging diagnostic problems. The sudden appearance of cracked tooth syndrome does not suggest that the dentist did something wrong. It is generally due to a pre existing crack which suddenly allowed the tooth segments to spring apart when the antediluvian filling was removed, or when the dentist cut a latest surface in order to remove decomposition.

Patients who have pain after a dental procedure are rushed to blame the dentist for the problem, when the problem could have been at hand all along, but just hadn't surfaced nonetheless.
i would tend to disagree with you until I can see your pretreatment x-rays. Sometimes hitting the brass neck while removing the decay from the tooth is unavoidable. An xray is a 2 dimensional imitation of a 3 dimensional object. Ultimately you are the one responsible for your tooth being the passageway it is. NOT the dentist. You went to him for help. He did a padding because obviously you had rotting in your tooth. You need to speak to your dentist and work out some sort of arrangement beside him. He is highly unlikely to be responsible and your sister-in-law shouldn't have blamed you dentist beside out all the information such as x-rays. He will have x-rays of your teeth showing how philosophical the decay was and how close it be to the nerve. If your tooth was out of date near the nerve next it's not his fault. He had to remove the rust and more importantly you'll just be told that it is your fault for decaying your tooth so much surrounded by the first place. No dentist has ever been in charge for this because we just try to fix the damage that you did yourself over years.

It is a recognised complication of a innards and that is what the General Dental Council will tell you.