I'm bleeding through my super plus tampon every 35-45 Min's?

I'm getting really dizzy and lightheaded i have had my time for 11 years and i have never had this problem in the past what do i do i really need to know if this might be a really big problem. thank you
yes, that is a big problem. even if you have to change that super plus tampon every 2 hours, that's TOO much.

call your doctor or shift to the ER before you pass out or budge anemic.
This is worth a bid to your gynecologist's office, more to set your mind at ease than because something's horribly wrong.

FWIW, my grandfather be a gynecologist, and his first question to patients who called at home in the order of excessive menstrual bleeding was to ask if it filled their shoes. If it didn't, it could hang around until office hours the next daytime.

The dizzy light-headedness is not unusual during heavy period. It's possibly you're just having bleeding that's unusual for you.
Call your doctor immediately.
You might have an ovarian cyst that ruptured and is calling the extra bleeding. Precancerous cell in the cervix can cause immense bleeding too.
if you are at the beginning of your period it can be particularly heavy. make sure to drink plenty of hose down, eat foods that iron in them, and also rest. if you be aware of the need to set up an appt w/ur doctor. just trade name sure to frequently change your tampon and wear dark bottom clothing. also since it is really weighty you can also wear a pad while you have on a tampon. hope this help. Call your doctor immediately.
You might have an ovarian cyst that ruptured and is calling the extra bleeding. Precancerous cell in the cervix can cause immense bleeding too.
Did you basically have a baby? My first two perioda after have my daughter were heavy, I be lightheaded, and flush.. It's not a serious thing if you just have a baby.. But if you didn't you really should call your doctor...
my daughter has just be prescribed (MEFENAMIC ACID CAPSULES) for the same thing the doctor said its supposed to peroxide the flow , id say jump and see the doctor regardless to ask if your suitable for these capsules or incase its anything else, better to be safe than sorry! best ov luck! Did you basically have a baby? My first two perioda after have my daughter were heavy, I be lightheaded, and flush.. It's not a serious thing if you just have a baby.. But if you didn't you really should call your doctor...
you requirement to seek argent medical attention. it's not normal and you may loose too much blood.
i see a lady on t.v that was leak through her pad every single hour and normal would be atleast 3 hours or more and she have a rare condition and had to grasp her uterus and all that stuff removed so check wita doc. yes, that is a big problem. even if you have to change that super plus tampon every 2 hours, that's TOO much.

call your doctor or shift to the ER before you pass out or budge anemic.
I would ring up the doctor immediately. Don't kow what your personal life is similar to, but could be a miscarriage? I don't have a source for this, but it is a possibility. Another possibility is the ovarian cyst as the other girl suggested. In either defence, it's important for you to call the doctor and notify them (even if you have to tell the front department to get through to a nurse right away) your symptoms - if you've never had this, it's MUCH better to be not detrimental than sorry

Good luck!
Go to the hospital NOW! I had the same problem within early March and had to enjoy a blood transfusion. Turns on in my case, I be having a miscarriage. Had no pain or anything! i aversion it when people right silly immature answres. approaching aids...
well why dont you go to the doctors and and they will put you on a pill that will stop u have heavy periods and try using tampax hope this help luv good luck
Answers:    A primary PPH or postpartum haemorrhage is heavy bleeding -- defined as the loss of more than 500ml of blood within the first 24 hours of the birth. It happens in more or less five per cent of deliveries.

Primary PPH may be due to bleeding from tears to the vagina, perineum or cervix, a blood clotting disorder, or a retained placenta but most (about 90 per cent) are due to the uterus not contracting down properly after the birth, and this is known as uterine atony. Once the placenta is deliver, the uterus should contract strongly to shut off all the blood vessel where the placenta was attached. This happen naturally but it can be speeded up with an injection of oxytocin which your midwife can present you just as the baby is human being born.

If the uterus is relaxed instead of contracted, the vessels will bleed. You may feel the blood trickling out or sometimes it builds up inside your uterus, so you may not be aware of the haemorrhage until signs of shock appear -- a drop surrounded by blood pressure and a rise in your pulse rate, and you may feel giddy and dizzy. Your midwife will regularly check your fundus, the top of your uterus, after delivery by feeling it to brand name sure it stays firm and contracted. If it is soft she will 'rub up' a contraction and may give you another oxytocin injection. If the bleeding is very severe, a blood transfusion may be needed.

Uterine atony is more predictable to happen after a very short or fundamentally long labour, after a caesarean section or an assisted abdication (ventouse or forceps). It can happen when the uterus has be over-stretched, for example in women who are expecting twins or have too much amniotic fluid contained by their womb. It is also more common in women who own had four or more babies, women who have have bleeding during their pregnancy (known as APH - antepartum haemorrhage) and women who have fibroids. The more of these factors that are present, the high the risk of haemorrhage. Having already had one PPH, you are at increased risk of having another as the replication rate is about 20--25 per cent, so it is probably wise to enjoy your baby in hospital, newly in case.

Secondary PPH is defined as any markedly heavy bleeding, which happens at any time between 24 hours and six weeks after the birth. Most crop up between five and ten days after delivery and occur within about one per cent of births. Bleeding may be due to small pieces of the placenta or membrane being retained contained by the uterus or to an infection. Antibiotics and sometimes an operation to empty the uterus -- a D&C (dilatation and curettage) may be necessary.
Go see your doctor immediately. you requirement to seek argent medical attention. it's not normal and you may loose too much blood.
i aversion it when people right silly immature answres. approaching aids...
well why dont you go to the doctors and and they will put you on a pill that will stop u have heavy periods and try using tampax hope this help luv good luck
I would travel to the doctor . Getting dizzy is not normal either